Social Media Advice

Eight lessons about Social Media Strategy

Eight lessons about Social Media Strategy from Frank Underwood

By Katerina Petropoulou (Twitter Counter)

In honor of the new season of House of Cards launching on February 27th, we picked eight quotes from Frank Underwood, the most beloved and hated character ever, that teach us some valuable lessons about social media and life in general.

*Please note that we accept no responsibility if after reading this you have a craving for Freddy’s ribs or a tendency to speak directly into a camera in front of other people.

“There’s no better way to overpower a trickle of doubt than with a flood of naked truth”

Being honest is always a good strategy especially on Social Media. If social media users perceive your messages and intentions as sincere, they will engage with you. Being truthful about what you stand for, authentic in the way you communicate with your audience will help you establish a good reputation on social media and build meaningful relationships with your audience.

“Insecurity bores me”

Frank is right; insecurity is boring. What your audience expects from you is to be confident about your brand or product and a thought leader in your industry. Being confident about the quality of what you have to offer translates into trustworthiness.

“If you don’t like how the table is set, turn over the table”

Social Media are open platforms where people discuss about brands and products, share opinions and feedback. Therefore, it is important to monitor online conversations and actively engage in them.

If you don’t like what is being said about your brand on social media, don’t try to dismiss it, ignore it or silence it. Instead, join the conversation and try to shape it by being transparent, knowledgable, open and responsive. Use your social media channels to demonstrate the impact of your brand’s efforts and create new, positive experiences for your audience.

If you don’t like how the table is set, turn over the table

“After all, we are nothing more or less than what we choose to reveal”

What Frank means to say is that you need to carefully think about your content strategy on social media, using your content and channels attentively to build a community around your brand and create awareness.

Once a tweet or a Facebook post is live, it is there for everyone to see. There have been times when brands have been reckless on what they post on social media. In 2012, KitchenAid tweeted a highly inappropriate comment about President Obama’s deceased grandmother which led to a huge backlash and a great damage on the brand’s reputation.

Bottom line is, always think twice before posting something on social media. After all, positive content is engaging, optimistic and most of all politically correct!

After all, we are nothing more or less than what we choose to reveal

“Generosity is its own form of power”

Frank gets it! Being generous is good karma and on social media, there are many ways to be generous to your audience. A recent study showed that people follow brands on social media for special deals and promotions and access to exclusive content. So reward your audience by giving them what they’re looking for and express your appreciation by actively engaging with them. Do it for karma and do it for business.

“Even Achilles was only as strong as his heel”

The basis of an effective marketing plan is knowing your brand’s strengths and weaknesses. This way, you can identify where you should focus on, what needs your attention and resources and take action to turn your weaknesses into strengths.

“Run the marathon not the sprint”

Social media is a tool to help you reach your marketing goals, meaning that you shouldn’t treat social media as separate of your overall marketing strategy but rather as an integrated part of it.

Therefore, it is important to keep your eyes on the prize and set your action plan, just like Frank would. Define your SMART goals (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-Bound) and come up with your key performance indicators (KPIs) of success.

Run the Marathon, not the sprint.

“Read the fine print”

Frank is a man of detail. So let’s be Frank about it and keep a close eye to your social media analytics and making reporting on your social media activity a habit. This way, you gain better insights into how far you are from achieving your business goals but also you keep the impact of social media on your brand measurable.

“To improve is to change. To perfect is to change often”

Remember that your social media strategy is in no way static but it should rather evolve with you. So, revisit, revaluate and redefine your social media action plan frequently. After all, nothing is written on stone.

Katerina is a curious blogger, professional tweeter, emerging marketer, community supporter and keen storyteller. She loves all social media, but if she were one, she’d probably be Twitter. Life goal: to figure out whether “You know nothing Jon Snow” is an axiom or a mere assumption.

facebook-for-business

Facebook For Small Business

Here’s a great post from Jason Mollica on the Social Fresh blog about how Facebook can help small businesses:

 

We’ve all heard that social media can help grow your business and brand, financially.

But say you are a Mom and Pop coffee shop in a small town.

Why would you want to use Facebook?

Why NOT?!
Small town businesses can use social media to grow their customer base. I work with these types of businesses and their owners often do not see the connection between social and more foot traffic.
Let’s be honest, there are still many businesses that recoil when they hear the words Facebook and Twitter.

These five tips can be effective when talking to any small business. What can social media do for them?

1. Helps a business re-think their marketing strategies

While advertising in a local newspaper is great, you are only reaching a small portion of your audience.
For example, you could spend upwards of $1,000 for just a half-page ad. Take the money you would spend in print and go global.
Granted small businesses may not have the money to hire a full-time social media manager. They could, however, be looking for a consultant to offer assistance.
Take Sweet Sixteen Cafe in Lockport, N.Y. They have a simple, but effective website and use their Facebook page to entice customers to come into the store.

2. Recommend a YouTube or Flickr page

I recently worked with a tourism group to allocate funds from unnecessary advertising into the purchase of a small HD video camera and a digital camera.
This allowed the group to take photos and video without spending thousands. It helped generate more business for the town and encouraged additional tourism dollars.
We established a YouTube page and will be putting more photos on Flickr. Giving potential visitors and customers an idea of who you are and what you stand for is key to personalizing the experience.
Who wouldn’t want to see a video of what your the area looks like during the holidays or showing a smiling customer enjoying something in your store?
If you keep at it, Youtube can also be a great search opportunity, helping potential customers find your business in a visual and engaging way.

3. Understanding the changing business climate can save money AND business

Not only do you need to understand what you are telling your clients, you need to understand their business.
We can tell prospective and current clients how the tools work, but if we don’t know how they will be effective for their business, what’s the point? In this economic climate, there is plenty of uncertainty.
We need to provide examples of certainty. The money saved now, can go a long way to turning a profit, as Lake Effect Ice Cream in Lockport, N.Y. has shown.

4. Give your business a personality

I have a small boutique inn as a client. You could read all the great amenities that they have on a website, but it has been Facebook that has allowed us to explain who they are and how they treat their customers.
Their followers regularly interact with them now, even telling them when they plan to come back. When a guest stays with them, they often mention how they feel part of the “Brookins experience” because of how the inn “talks” to them on Facebook. The return guest rate has gone up to nearly 95%.

5. Most importantly… it’s a perfect customer service tool

If that’s the one thing you can stress the most, do it. Businesses want to make sure their current customers are taken care of. Mom and Pop type-businesses aren’t any different. As a matter of fact, it probably means more.
Exceptional social media customer service, to go along with terrific in-person service, will go a long way to building social capital AND business success.
What are some tips you give small businesses for social success?

 Image source: BigStock.com Shopping carts and shoppers